Posted in Career Insights

what is a funeral directorWhat is a funeral director?

A funeral director manages a funeral home and arranges the details for funerals. Funeral directors are also referred to as undertakers or morticians.

While funeral directors, undertakers, and morticians are technically different jobs, many workplaces combine these jobs under the title of “funeral director”.

Overall, funeral directors are responsible for the daily management of a funeral home and organizing the logistics and details of funerals or supervising the staff that does so.

A funeral director’s job is to make the funeral as easy and painless for the surviving loved ones as possible.

What do Funeral Directors do?

When there they are not managing the details of a specific funeral, a funeral director is responsible for managing a funeral home or crematory. This can include supervising and training staff, discussing funeral plans with those who want to plan ahead, and maintaining financial records.

If you are interested in working in a funeral home, the Stratford Career Institute Funeral Service Education course prepares you to work alongside a funeral director.

What do Funeral Directors do Before a Funeral?

Before a funeral, a funeral director or their staff can be responsible for many details such as:

  • Arranging transportation of the deceased
  • Preparing the body
  • Working with loved ones to arrange the funeral service
  • Handling legal documentation
  • Sending obituaries
  • Answering any questions about “what is a funeral director” and what they can help with

What do Funeral Directors do During and After a Funeral?

A funeral director’s job is not just limited to arranging the details before a service. They are often discretely present at funerals and visitations, and their job does not end when the last guest leaves. Funeral directors should:

  • Be present at funerals and visitations to handle any complications
  • Ensure respectful disposal of the deceased in accordance with personal or loved ones’ wishes
  • Handle any paperwork the family has asked them to
  • Follow up with the family as needed

Paperwork can be an extremely important part of a funeral director’s job. Some funeral directors or their staff may draft obituaries, submit paperwork to the state, help resolve insurance claims, notify federal insurance agencies, and request death certificates.

Working in a Funeral Home

Working in a funeral home can be stressful.

Many funerals happen quickly after a death, meaning that staff have to arrange funerals on tight deadlines with little notice. Working at a funeral home can often mean working nights and weekends, as you need to be available when clients need you.

Funeral directors need to be very respectful and sympathetic to the clients that they work with. Many times the clients that funeral directors work with are grieving. Funeral directors and other staff need to empathize and help guide mourning family members through the grieving process.

Learn More About Working in a Funeral Home

If you want to work in a funeral home, the Funeral Service Education course prepares you for career of working under a funeral director.

Or, browse the Stratford Career Institute course catalogue to find a course that interests you and enroll today!

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Get Your Career Started Today

Get Your Career Started Today

If you want to work in a funeral home, the Funeral Service Education course prepares you for career of working under a funeral director.

Enroll today!